Prisoner Writers

The International Service Organization (ISO) of SAA is looking for volunteers to write to fellow sex addicts who are incarcerated or in civil confinement.

These addicts are asking for help from SAA, but they cannot attend in-person SAA meetings, or even telemeetings. They can’t get a sponsor. And the institutions that house them offer little in the way of treatment or rehabilitation.

By writing to an inmate and sharing your experience, strength, and hope with them, you can provide them with much-needed support and encouragement and hopefully change their lives for the better.

Please fill in the following form so that we can match you with an inmate to whom you can write. The Prisoner Outreach Committee has suggested a set of minimum requirements for being a letter writer. Please let us know that you meet these minimums.

  1. l have a minimum of one year in the program
  2. I have a minimum of six months continuous sobriety
  3. I have worked the Twelve Steps with a sponsor.
  4. I am committed to bringing the message of experience, strength, and hope to those desiring to recover from sex addiction.

Please answer the following questions so we can match you with an inmate. The ISO will use this information to contact you, to forward prisoner mail to you, and to connect you with an inmate who is a good match. This information will not be made available to an inmate or anyone else.


MaleFemaleHeteroGayLesbianBiTrans


YesNoUncertain


YesNo


I acknowledge that I have a minimum of one year in the program, a minimum of six months continuous sobriety, have worked the Twelve Steps with a sponsor, and am committed to bringing the message of experience, strength, and hope to those desiring to recover from sex addiction (Required)

By clicking “Submit” you acknowledge that you meet all four requirements listed above.

*Please note: If you click “Can correspond to inmate via email” you will need to sign up for an online program to write to inmates. This will result in the loss of some anonymity.

** Some prisons will not accept mail from someone using only a first name and last initial. To avoid using their last name and to protect their anonymity, many letter writers have chosen to use an alias. (Example: John Jones, who would be known in the program as John J, might use the alias John Jay)