“It is anonymity, the spirit of selfless service, that reminds us as a fellowship to always base our actions and deliberations on spiritual principles, putting aside any personal considerations in favor of a higher good — carrying the message of recovery to [other] sex addicts.”

— Sex Addicts Anonymous, p. 96

Tradition Twelve states. “Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.”

Within the context of SAA, anonymity has significance on multiple levels. On one level, we practice anonymity by using only our first names in introducing ourselves and addressing others in meetings.

Our personal identity and occupation is of no concern to group members. Likewise, who we meet and what is said in meetings is not discussed with non-group members. This level of confidentiality is essential for our meetings to be a safe place for all who attend.

On a second level, we yield our personal identity to the group or the fellowship as a whole. Our concern is for the unity and welfare of the fellowship over any personal considerations.

On yet another level, we remain anonymous with respect to the public media. Tradition Eleven requires “…personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, TV, and film.” This tradition protects us individually on one hand from the temptation of celebrity and corporately on the other hand from public criticism and controversy, as also emphasized by Tradition Ten.

And finally on an even deeper level, anonymity carries the idea of giving up the self-centered nature of our addiction. As we turn our will over to the care of God as we understand God, we can reach out in concern and love to other sex addicts unfettered by personal issues or quirks of personality.

This does not mean losing a healthy sense of self, but it is anonymity, the spirit of selfless service, that reminds us as a fellowship to always base our actions and deliberations on spiritual principles, putting aside any personal considerations in favor of a higher good — carrying the message of recovery to other sex addicts.